When two nouns refer to the same person or thing, the verb is in the singular form.

  • My uncle and handyman is very useful.
  • Not: My uncle and handyman are very useful.

  • The owner and manager of the store is very friendly.
  • Not: The owner and manager of the store are very friendly.

  • My friend and neighbour has been a magician for many years.
  • Not: My friend and neighbour have been a magician for many years.
 

When two nouns refer to the same person, the article ‘the’ is used only once and the verb is in the singular.

  • The nurse and sister of the patient cares deeply for him. (Nurse and sister are the same person, singular verb cares is used.)
  • Not: The nurse and sister of the patient care deeply for him.

  • The nurse and sister of the patient was very caring.
  • Not: The nurse and sister of the patient were very caring.

  • The owner and occupant of the haunted house was never seen again.
  • Not: The owner and occupant of the haunted house were never seen again.
 

When two different persons are referred to, the article ‘the’ is repeated and the verb is in the plural.

  • The owner and the occupant of the house are very good friends.
  • The teacher and the father of the student are talking about him.
 

Phrases beginning with ‘with’, ‘as well as’, ‘together with’, etc do not mean the same as ‘and’, and the verb is therefore in the singular.

  • The woman with her daughter is selling flowers.
  • Not: The woman with her daughter are selling flowers.

  • Bob as well as his brother is selected to play in the team.
  • Not: Bob as well as his brother are selected to play in the team.

  • The box of milk chocolate together with the birthday cake makes a nice present for her.
  • Not: The box of milk chocolate together with the birthday cake make a nice present for her.
 

‘Each’ and ‘every’ joined by ‘and’ take a singular verb.

  • Each and every participant has to undergo a medical examination.
  • Not: Each and every participant have to undergo a medical examination.

  • Every girl and every boy here wants to participle.
  • Not: Every girl and every boy here want to participle.
 

When two nouns are treated as one entity, the verb is in the singular.

  • Bread and butter was his daily breakfast. (Bread and butter stand for one item of food, so a singular verb is used.)
  • Milk and fruit is a good diet.
  • Time and tide waits for no man.
 

When a quantity or an amount is treated as a whole, the verb used is singular.

  • The $100.00 you lent me was not enough.
  • Two hundred dollars nowadays is not a big sum.
  • How many cents is equal to one dollar?
  • She said seventy kilograms was her weight.
  • Ten kilometers is a long distance to walk.