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Either is about one or the other of two people or things. It can also mean one and the other of two people or things. As for neither, it’s not one or the other of two people or things. As determiners, either and neither come before a singular countable noun.

Either: one or the other of two

Examples:

  • I don’t mind which fish. Just give me either one, please.
  • You can take either road; both roads will lead you there.
  • You may use either hand to hold it.

 

Either: one and the other of two

Examples:

  • He has big ears on either side (= both sides) of his head.
  • There are toilets at either end of the long corridor.
  • There were no goals scored of either match.

 

Neither is used to show not either of two people or things.

Examples:

  • Neither one of us is a smoker.
  • Neither sweater you bought for me fits me.
  • “I have found these two coins.” “Neither coin is foreign.”

 

Either is commonly used before a pronoun.

Examples:

  • Either she is telling the truth or she does not know she is telling a lie.
  • Either he or his brother is going to help her with her homework.

 

A noun that follows either or neither is singular.

Examples:

  • You can choose either twin bed, and I will take the other one.
  • He was punched hard on the nose, but neither nostril was bleeding.